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Oyster Bacteria Related Deaths Reported In Florida


July 24, 2018
by Max Gotlieb - Healthcare Reporter


According to TIME Magazine, “A Florida man has died after eating a raw oyster contaminated with a highly infectious strain of bacteria.” Health officials have identified the cause of death as a flesh-eating bacteria called Vibrio vulnificus. It causes infection of skin and open wounds.
Vibrio vulnificus symptoms include irregular or rapid heartbeat and congestive heart failure. The bacteria are commonly found in brackish water during summer months. Typical contraction methods are through the consumption of undercooked seafood or entrance through open wounds.
To prevent contracting the bacteria, officials recommend that all wounds are properly dressed before going into the water. Another suggestion is to only eat well-prepared seafood, such as oysters.
In the event that one does become infected, knowing BLS, commonly known as CPR, is recommended. The bacteria can cause irregular heartbeats, so knowing how to save the infected person’s life in the event of an emergency is crucial. Medical professionals should be well-versed in BCLS, ACLS, or PALS. These are all life-saving techniques. BCLS is basic cardiac life support. PALS is pediatric advanced life support and ACLS is advanced cardiac life support.
To get these certifications, online certification is recommended. ACLS online certification is fast and easy through www.cprtrainingfast.com.  Earning these credentials will help medical professionals be best prepared to handle those who contract vibrio vulnificus through the consumption of undercook seafood.

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